Rolling Stone

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tibby2k
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Postby tibby2k » Wed Jul 17, 2002 3:31 pm

can someone who has the interview scan it and post it up? i can't get it were i live

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Eminemsgirl
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Postby Eminemsgirl » Wed Jul 17, 2002 4:06 pm

Have tried going to rollingstone.com? I know they have at least one/fifth of the interview there. Also I'll see what I can do about getting the full article. :)

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Postby tibby2k » Thu Jul 18, 2002 3:05 am

Thanks! See what you can do. :P

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Postby Eminemsgirl » Thu Jul 18, 2002 10:09 am

Here's part of the interview:

Eminem: The Rolling Stone Interview

The loose-lipped rapper isn't afraid of his demons. Should you be?

By Anthony Bozza


In a lounge chair in the presidential suite of a Detroit hotel, Eminem sits as he always does: leaning back in his chair, his legs wide apart, eyes straight ahead. He's dressed head to toe in Air Jordan. Sometimes, he suddenly leans forward to emphasize a point, tucking his hand under his chin or gesturing with a pointed finger, the way he does onstage. His eyes and skin are clear; he looks lean and in shape, and he has an odd, almost angelic glow to him, as if he's been wandering the desert with hip-hop monks. He's been keeping late hours, but it doesn't show, maybe due to better eats. ("Damn, they didn't get me fries with that," he says, eyeing a room-service tuna melt. "I'm off that no-carb diet.") He is relaxed, a king in his castle, ready to greet the world after a year of battle.
Since the release of his second album, The Marshall Mathers LP, in May 2000, Eminem has seen his celebrity grow into a sun orbited by his own label (Shady Records), his partners in rhyme D12, a planet of fans, a nascent movie career (with the release of 8 Mile this fall) and an asteroid field of cops, lawyers and judges. In August 2000, he filed for divorce from his twisted muse and the love of his life, Kim, whom he had married only a year earlier. They shared eleven years and now share custody of their six-year-old daughter, Hailie Jade.

In June 2000, while he and Kim were still married, Eminem witnessed her kissing another man outside a suburban Detroit bar. After a very short internal debate, Em pistol-whipped the guy and earned himself the first of two felony charges that year - the second came after an altercation involving the ersatz rap group the Insane Clown Posse (see "The Troubles He's Seen," Page 75). The two charges spelled possible jail time for twenty-eight-year-old Marshall Mathers, a gangsta reality he was scared as hell to add to his portfolio. To spice the stew further, Eminem's vitriolic rhymes made him the constant subject of protests by gay -- and women's-rights groups.

The threat of prison and his current probation woke him up and grew him up right quick. He stopped drinking and downing purple pills and, as always, took his angst to the studio. The Eminem Show is confident, complex, edgy, banging and fresh. "I'm paranoid as f*** about anything of mine sounding like a track I just did or like anything else out there," Eminem says. "I practically live in the studio, aside from spending time with Hailie. I always feel that I can improve something until I just get sick of it." Eminem handled most of the production himself, with three tracks coming from his mentor, Dr. Dre. On his own, Em samples Aerosmith's "Dream On" in "Sing for the Moment," sings to his daughter in "Hailie's Song" and attacks American moral hypocrisy throughout. His new songs make this last point better than ever before, because the man making them, more than ever, is aware of who he is and how to manipulate the world watching him.

It will certainly be watching when he makes his big-screen debut in November in 8 Mile, alongside Kim Basinger and Brittany Murphy. The film, produced by Brian Grazer (A Beautiful Mind), was developed with Eminem in mind, though it is not exactly a biopic. "I was looking to make a movie about hip-hop that, like Saturday Night Fever did, really puts you in that world," Grazer says. "I randomly saw Eminem on MTV, and in the span of six or seven seconds, he goes from this icy, urban, scary glare to this fluid, self-effacing, kind of fun character. I had to meet him." They did meet, but the free-flowing feeling wasn't quite there at first. "Em and his manager came in, and Em didn't say a word for about twenty minutes," Grazer says. "He just stared. I was only getting the icy part. It got really uncomfortable. But then, Em just opened up and told me about his life for over an hour." They enlisted the talents of Curtis Hanson, director of L.A. Confidential and Wonder Boys. "He's an extraordinarily gifted artist," Hanson says of Eminem. "If Internet piracy kills the music business, Marshall Mathers need not worry. He'll have another career."

Over the course of two days in Detroit, Eminem surveyed his ever-expanding Shady kingdom. He's more professional now, but he's equally eager to run off -- to his daughter, to his studio, to his home, to anyplace he can be in peace. Or maybe just to the lyric book he still carries with him everywhere, in which he's always scrawling, usually too small for anyone else to read.

You look focused and pretty happy. Have you calmed down?

I'm on probation now, so I don't have a choice. But I probably would've done it anyways -- perhaps it was a blessing in disguise. I'm growing up, and I figure there's a certain level of maturity that comes with that. [Starts picking left nostril] Hailie is better at this than I am. You know, when you build a booger castle with your daughter -- that's quality time. It's actually what we live in now, and we built it ourselves.

You wrote this album during an insane year -- lawsuits, divorce, the threat of jail time. Tell me about the early stages of the album.

"Sing for the Moment" was the first song I wrote for the album; "Cleanin Out My Closet" was the second. I had the line in "Cleanin Out My Closet" -- "I'd like to welcome y'all out to The Eminem Show" -- and it was just a line, but I sat back and I was like, "My life is really like a f***ing show." I have songs on the album that I wrote when I was in that sh** last year, with a possible jail sentence hangin' over my head and all the emotions going through the divorce. I went through a lot of sh** last year that I resolved at the same time, all in the same year. And, yeah, that's when half of the album was wrote.

"Dream On" was a desperate, hopeful song when Aerosmith wrote it. Is that why you used it?

Yeah. I was in that sh**, and I didn't know what was going to happen to me -- I thought I was goin' to jail. But the scariest thought was, "How am I going to tell this to Hailie?" What am I going to say -- "Daddy's goin' away and he's bad, and you have to come visit him in jail"? I never told her anything, because if there was a slim chance that I'd get off, then I didn't want to put her through that emotionally -- being scared. She hates when I go away, anytime. "Sing for the Moment" is that frustration and all that sh**. There I was, in the f***ing precinct getting booked, and the cops were asking me for autographs while they were f***ing booking me, and I'm doing it, I'm giving them the autographs. But I'm like, "My life is in f***ing shambles right now, and you look at me like I am not a f***ing person. I am a walking spectacle." I signed it. "They're the police, and I'm sure that if Marshall is a good guy, word will get around, so OK, f*** it, lemme do it." OK, yeah, I'm a criminal and I did a couple of things that I shouldn'a did, but I'm still a human, and people make mistakes. I didn't do anything different than any other person would have done that night [when he caught Kim kissing another man]. Some people would have done more than me, but I don't know of a man on this f***in' earth that would have done less -- not to say exactly what I did.

You always talk about your daughter, Hailie Jade, in your songs, but on this album, "Hailie's Song" is a much more personal message. Plus, you sing -- that is certainly putting yourself out there.

That song was stress off my chest. That's how it is with every song I do; it's therapy and it's releasing everything onto a record instead of doing any of it. I really dumped my feelings out in that song. I love my little girl enough to sing to her, for one, and two, it wasn't easy what I went through last year. Divorce is the hardest thing that I've ever worked through -- not that I'm bitter or anything like that. I'm a better person because I went through it, but it was hard at first. I've known this chick all my life, she's the first true girlfriend that I ever had. You grow up with this person, and then they want to leave you. And at first you don't know what to do. You know, I put the blame on everything. I put the blame on myself, I put the blame on my career. But as I got through it, I stepped back and looked at the whole picture. I realized it wasn't my fault and there's nothing I could have done. It was inevitable. It's cool, me and Kim are on speaking terms, we can communicate, no hard feelings, f*** it. Didn't work, you know, after eleven years.



:) :) :)

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Postby tibby2k » Thu Jul 18, 2002 4:45 pm

thanks again. any chance someone could post the rest? :lol:

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Postby tibby2k » Thu Aug 15, 2002 1:25 pm

someone must have the rollingstone interview 2 scan up i cant get it anywhere. please

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Postby tibby2k » Tue Oct 08, 2002 12:04 pm

has anybody out there got the whole article!


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