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Postby justins bubbles » Fri Mar 26, 2004 12:26 am

<span style='color:blue'>:shrug: You wouldn't ever expect it though. :rolleyes: </span>

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Postby renee » Fri Mar 26, 2004 12:46 am

:lol: the subtle wild ones!

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Postby JT Fan Girl » Sun Mar 28, 2004 11:30 am

^ :huh: :lol:

Ok everyone don't forget Jason is on American Dreams today! :nono:

And I have a new John article...

Stop that swooning and listen to the dude

BY MOLLY PRIESMEYER
Special to the Pioneer Press

Too much hype can be poisonous for an artist. Look what happened to Bennifer: Ben Affleck ended up trading in his Adidas track suits for sleeveless leather vests, looking like a rebel-rousing, hard-edged country singer on the recent issue of Rolling Stone. And J. Lo's bootylicious image has been cut from the ads for "Jersey Girl."

You won't find Connecticut-born singer-songwriter John Mayer begging for that type of tabloid-fueled celeb status. Despite his model-baiting heartthrob image and the hordes of young female fans wielding signs begging Mayer to be their betrothed, the Grammy-winning musician has eschewed "TRL" appearances for performances with such legendary artists as Buddy Guy and Stevie Ray Vaughan's band, Double Trouble.

For his latest record, "Heavier Things," Mayer enlisted jazz trumpeter Roy Hargrove and Roots drummer ?uestlove to appear instead of the Neptunes. And the 26-year-old Mayer, who wants a 30-year career complete with his own CD rack in stores, wishes young men would stare at his fast-moving fingers as often as girls squeal when he glances in their direction.

In a phone interview last week, Mayer, who performs at the Xcel Energy Center tonight, talked about the trials and tribulations of a fickle, celeb-obsessed industry and how even growing up in suburban Connecticut gave him the blues.

How does a kid from suburban Connecticut get the blues? You're born with it. That's the thing, that's how I know I was made for it. I have no previous track record of liking anything to do with it. I wasn't born around it, didn't live around it. And I found it, and it was like an umbilical connection to the music. And when I discovered it, it was over.

Do you think it's harder to be a career artist today, given that labels look for that one major hit?

I think everybody plans on having a career. If you asked everybody who was unfortunately rushed through the exit door of their career, I think they all would've wanted to go around a few more times. I think that I might be doing things that are safer bets. I don't think that I want it more than anyone else. I think that the way that it's been gone about has been more kind of like taking it in an annuity, not at a lump sum.

Does your heartthrob status conflict with your desire to be a serious artist?

I think it's just a part of it. I'm 26 and have no visible scars. When you're at least not offensive looking and you sing songs about "your body is a wonderland," it kind of makes sense. And everyone who kind of cuts me down a little bit, it makes total sense based on who they are. And everyone who thinks they want to marry me, it makes sense based on who they are. At the same time, it's fascinating to me. If you can see inside my brain and what I'm trying to do onstage, the last thing that comes to mind is make people swoon.

Is it hard to shy away from that when the industry is so focused on image?

But you can't try to affect the perception of what you're doing. And that's why so much of music is so messed up right now. On the artist level, people try so hard to affect the perception. You can't. It's like rigging a vote. You can't do it. Just be yourself, and if people like you, they like you.

This current album reflects dreams of domesticity. Are you really a homebody?

Sure. I don't like the idea of vacations. People say, "Oh, you're off next month, are you going to take a vacation?" What the hell are you talking about? I'm gonna be at home!

What does that life look like to you?

Psychologically, what I crave in my life is routine. I like the idea of being a salary guy. I like the idea of having a Monday through Friday that's lit the same. Your childhood is based on 18 years of routine. I find that at my most comfortable moment, I'm remembering or echoing some emotion that I had 15 years ago. The thing about being on the road is that you're not in a structure. And that's why a lot of people have done drugs, sort of just knock themselves out.

So how do you keep your sanity?

Oh, I do the drugs, too. No, I'm kidding. You just have to remember that the feeling, the feeling of get me out of here, is not real. You can get out at any time you want to. That's the thing. I don't really feel trapped on the road because if at any moment I don't want to do it anymore, then I just won't do it anymore. Otherwise, you end up dead. But I've never pulled the cable. And if I did, no one saw it.

You were part of a hilarious skit on "Chappelle's Show." If there were a contest between you and Dave Grohl to be rock's funny man, who do you think would win?

Oh, you think I'm like Dave Grohl? Oh my God, that's great! Really? Oh, I think Dave Grohl's funnier.

Well, he is getting older. You could be his replacement.

(Laughs) Yeah, there's a new gun in town.

And he's 6-foot-3.

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Postby lancechica4 » Sun Mar 28, 2004 11:50 am

:wub: I like that one. And cheers to a CD rack devoted entirely to John! :D

And :jawdrop: to Mamma Bubs! Now THAT'S cool. :nod:

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Postby justins bubbles » Sun Mar 28, 2004 6:15 pm

<span style='color:blue'>Aww, John :wub:'s Dave too!! Dave's my fave. :lol: :headbanger:

:rofl: @ mama bubs ;) </span>

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Postby renee » Mon Mar 29, 2004 11:51 pm

:ph34r: do i know dave grohl? :shrug:

:lol: i saw the 'mama bubs' and just took it for granted that's what her name is :lol:

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Postby JT Fan Girl » Tue Mar 30, 2004 12:20 pm

renee wrote::ph34r: do i know dave grohl? :shrug:


:lol: Lead singer in the Foo Fighters, he's the only one out of all of them whose name I know. :P

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Postby justins bubbles » Tue Mar 30, 2004 11:29 pm

<span style='color:blue'>I :wub: him. </span>

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Postby JT Fan Girl » Wed Mar 31, 2004 10:27 am

John Mayer carves out summer tour dates

by Jon Zahlaway
liveDaily Staff Writer


March 29, 2004 12:48 PM - Grammy-winning singer/songwriter John Mayer gets busy this summer with a major tour of U.S. amphitheaters.



The run kicks off in Milwaukee on July 2, and dates continue through the end of August. Maroon 5--which opened for Mayer during his U.S. tour earlier this year--returns to the opening slot, with additional support from DJ Logic.

Ticket on-sale information was not available at press time. Members of Mayer's official fan club, dubbed Local 83, will have a shot at tickets before they go on sale to the general public, according to Mayer's website.

Mayer fans can also catch a glimpse of him during a pair of upcoming television performances: March 29 on "The Late Show with David Letterman" and April 29 on "Late Night with Conan O'Brien."

In May, Mayer heads to Europe to open a number of spring dates. After that, he returns to the states for a June 5 appearance at the Crossroads Guitar Festival in Dallas. The three-day event will also feature Eric Clapton, Doyle Bramhall II, Vince Gill, Buddy Guy, B.B. King, Sonny Landreth, Pat Metheny, Otis Rush, Carlos Santana, James Taylor, ZZ Top and others.

Mayer's road work supports his second major-label album, "Heavier Things," which surfaced last September and debuted at No. 1 on The Billboard 200 chart. Beginning in April, a limited-edition version of the album will feature a 5-track bonus disc that houses live versions of "Neon" and "Come Back to Bed," acoustic and radio remixes of "Clarity," and a studio recording of Mayer's rendition of Radiohead's "Kid A."

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Postby JT Fan Girl » Fri Apr 02, 2004 3:43 am

"I’ve decided to head back out on the road in May and June!" - Jason. He's added nine dates for his tour so far but I'm sure he'll add more, so fingers crossed for everyone

04/08/04 Petco Park
San Diego, CA
singing National Anthem 6:48 - All Ages
SOLD OUT
Tickets: MLB

05/02/04 Music Midtown
Atlanta, GA
music festival 3:00 - All Ages
$45.00 $40.00
Tickets: TM

05/07/04 Cityfest Live
Charlotte, NC
music festival 6:00 - All Ages
$30.00 DOS | $25.00 ADV
Tickets: TM

05/30/04 William Floyd Amphitheatre
Anderson, SC
with Fuel & t.b.d. 7:30 - All Ages
$5.00
Tickets: t.b.d.

08/31/04 Sleep Train Amphitheatre
Marysville, CA
with Dave Matthews Band 7:00 - All Ages
$57.00 $39.50
Tickets: TM

09/03/04 Gorge Amphitheatre
Gorge, WA
with Dave Matthews Band 6:00 - All Ages
$60.40 $48.10
Tickets: TM

09/04/04 Gorge Amphitheatre
Gorge, WA
with Dave Matthews Band 6:00 - All Ages
$60.40 $48.10
Tickets: TM

09/05/04 Gorge Amphitheatre
Gorge, WA
with Dave Matthews Band 6:00 - All Ages
$60.40 $48.10
Tickets: TM

09/08/04 USANA Amphitheater
Salt Lake City, UT
with Dave Matthews Band 7:00 - All Ages
$56.00 $38.50
Tickets: TM

Also John has the most amayyyyzing hoodie you all have to see so if this pic doesn't work, lemme know. sea-of-faces.org/gallery/albums/letterman2004/lettermana009.jpghttp://www.sea-of-faces.org/gallery/albums...ttermana009.jpg :wub:

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Postby whatchagot4meMRJT » Fri Apr 02, 2004 12:50 pm

:lol: Aww, that John hoodie is the best I've seen!

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Postby JT Fan Girl » Fri Apr 02, 2004 2:51 pm

I want it! :lol: On second thoughts, I just want him. ^_^

‘Victoria’ leaves mark on Mayer

Call it the next best thing to having John Mayer serenade you with “Your Body Is a Wonderland.’’

During his show Sunday at the Resch Center, the 26-year-old singer/songwriter and reluctant heartthrob told the crowd that a girl he met at college inspired his next song. Her name was Victoria, he said, and she was in the audience that night. He went on to sing “Victoria,’’ a song from his lesser-known “Inside Wants Out’’ album.

It turns out Mayer’s muse was in the second row, and she was Green Bay singer/songwriter Victoria, who goes by only her first name.

She attended the Berklee College of Music in Boston with Mayer in the late 1990s. He lived seven doors down from her room, and they hung out with the same group of friends.

“He was one of the first people I met at Berklee,’’ Victoria said of Mayer. She remembers the first time they played a song for each other.

“When he got done, I was like, ‘Wow.’ I couldn’t believe he was a freshman, because he was so far advanced. He’s an amazing guitar player.’’

Victoria once recorded a few songs in the makeshift recording studio in Mayer’s dorm room, and she has a photo of the two of them at Berklee in her scrapbook. She also has a “more perverted’’ and unreleased version of the original “Victoria’’ on cassette.

Mayer eventually dropped out of Berklee; Victoria graduated in 2000 with a degree in songwriting. She hadn’t seen the Grammy winner “in like forever.’’ The two caught up with each other backstage at the Resch after the show.

On Friday night, Victoria will team up with another of her Berklee friends, Kellie Lin Knott, for a show at the Historic West Theatre. Billed as Tres Femmes, Victoria, Knott and Stolie — all singer/songwriters — will each perform her own acoustic pop-rock songs with backing by the other women.

Ok imagine there being a John song named after you. :wacko: "She also has a “more perverted’’ and unreleased version of the original “Victoria’’ on cassette." Well he did say he had porno versions of every song. :lol:

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Postby lancechica4 » Fri Apr 02, 2004 5:54 pm

:jawdrop: I have never wanted to be anyone more in my entire life. :ph34r: :lol:


JASON ON TOUR! JASON ON TOUR!!!!!!! :wacko:

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Postby justins bubbles » Sun Apr 04, 2004 1:17 am

<span style='color:blue'>I don't know...I wanted to be Janet many-a-times. :lol:

But I always wondered who Victoria was. And yeah, wished I could have been her. But I REALLY wanted to be Lydia. :lol:</span>

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Postby lancechica4 » Sun Apr 04, 2004 12:22 pm

One of my best friends is named Lydia. She's always so goddamn smug. <_<

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Postby JT Fan Girl » Mon Apr 05, 2004 2:03 pm

:lol: I wouldn't mind being any of those girls, but I'd love to be whoever Only Heart was written for. :wub:

Well suprise, I'm back with more news :P...

Mraz in Malibu on TRL Tomorrow, Tuesday 4/6
What's up Mrazsters - Make sure to catch some footage of Jason on MTV's TRL tomorrow, Tuesday 4/6. As part of TRL's 'High School Week', Mraz brought high schoolers to take a tour of a recording studio in Malibu, and learn a bit on how to make an album. They also got to record a couple of verses of 'Curbside Prophet' with Jason. Make sure to catch this tomorrow, Tuesday 4/6 on TRL.

If Jason decides to tour over here I am NOT going on holiday... that way there's no way I can miss him. :lol: :huh:

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Postby JT Fan Girl » Thu Apr 08, 2004 4:21 pm

THURSDAY APRIL 8
> TV: Jason will be singing the National Anthem tonight at the grand opening of the San Diego Padre's new PetCo Park. He goes on at 6:48 PST. Check local listings for stations.

:P

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Postby lancechica4 » Thu Apr 08, 2004 7:02 pm

:o :sprint:

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Postby JT Fan Girl » Fri Apr 09, 2004 12:43 pm

Stumbled upon this article, I have to go for my tea :P so not sure exactly what's it like but John can only mean good things so...

Coming back to blues

Will John Mayer’s alliance with Buddy Guy bring the pop star back to his blues roots? Will Buddy Guy’s alliance with John Mayer bring the blues legend a fresh audience? Damn right.

“I love the guitar. I love everything about itâ€￾ John Mayer is walking down the hall backstage at studio 6a in 30 Rockefeller Center, other wise know as the domain of NBC’s Conan O’ Brien.

“I love the way it looks, I love the way it feels I just..â€￾

The funny thing is, Mayer is alone. He’s not talking to anyone in particular. He’s just rhapsodizing, to himself. Now, this might not mean anything at all. As we’ve come to learn, especially from interviewing Mayer over the last couple of years, the guitarist speaks extemporaneously about any number of random things, often without rhyme or reason. That’s what makes him original.

Then again, this wee verbal intimacy could be revealing. After all, if you’ve seen him live, you do know how much he loves the guitar. That “Your Body is a Wonderlandâ€￾ tune, as silly as it seems, might very well have been about the body of a guitar. Okay, if you’ve seen the video maybe not. Still, the guitar had been extremely good to the kid, elevating him to the heights of pop success he could never have fathomed just two short years ago. And, perhaps most importantly, Mayer is in the beginning stages of a partnership with Chicago blues Legend Buddy Guy. So far, the budding alliance, initiated by Mayer, has enjoyed a few choice gigs, and, tonight, a television appearance on “late Night with Conan O’ Brienâ€￾ it’s the reason why we’re all crowded in the hallways high above the grid of Manhattan streets.

Why the coupling? Well, the ever-inquisitive and endlessly ambitious Mayer wanted to hang with Guy for what should be obvious reasons- and some perhaps not so obvious. Guy, on the other hand, wanted to hang with Mayer for obvious reasons as well, only in reverse. Says Guy “As soon as he said ‘hello’ I felt like I had relationship with himâ€￾.

We’re now crammed in a small room off the hallway, under the bright lights of a big makeup mirror. Dressed in a brown linen shirt and khaki pants, Guy is adorned with diamond-studded jewelry: a fat ring with the word “bluesâ€￾ written in diamonds, a bracelet that reads “Nothing but bluesâ€￾ in diamond studs, and another ring with his initials, also in diamonds. Yeah, the heavy gold serving as the frame to all this sparkle is more hip-hop accoutrement than one might expect from the humble Louisiana guitarist. But then, he emerged from mighty humble means, and he is, after all, the one and only Buddy Guy- He can wear what he wants.

“You can tell John’s into the musicâ€￾, he continues. “The first conversation we had, he told me about how he picked up the Stevie Ray record as a kid, and he heard that Stevie had learned something from me, and that Hendrix’s had too, so he felt like he had to track me down"

Today, Mayer is rising fast and gaining clout as a pop star, and he‘s decided to exercise some of that clout on artist who might teach him a thing or two. Guy, who Mayer felt would have also benefit from the exposure to his own pop audience, was at the top of Mayer’s phone list. “He called me from his tour in Europe and said he wanted to come into Chicago to see me’, Guy says “he got in and took the stage over at my place and played himself to death! And I said, “Lord, this kid’s another B.B King! You just never get tired of hearing him playâ€￾.

Mayer, wearing a humble expression, a bad sports coat, and a cheesy tie, doesn’t like the idea of dwelling on a compliment from a legend, so he returns one quickly. “everyone falls in love with Buddy when they see himâ€￾ he says, pointing at Guy with a guitar pick between his fingers. “ I was watching your face on stage, man, and you really came alive when you realized that all the young people who came to see me, were with you. They were with every word.

Guy’s presence in Mayer’s musical life is significant, if not critical. On his way to superstar status, amid the nightly throngs of adoring fans, Mayer now has a lodestar- and a well-grounded reality- in his new partner. Guy possesses a fusillade of classic Chicago licks, and now stands alongside a precious few as one of our greatest living blues players. His artistry is the kind Mayer, at 26, can now only dream about. Buddy Guy keeps John Mayer humble and primed to pick up new ideas. Not only that, he makes Mayer hungry.

John, this whole thing with buddy is interesting. But for whom are you doing it- yourself, or your audience?

JM: There are a lot of great signers out there. For whatever reason a lot of people have locked into what I'm doing. I'm lucky that people look up to me. Now, it’s like okay, cool, keep that focus on me, but check out-listen to Buddy Guy. They’ll like it based on what they know of me, which makes me lucky. Yeah, you can put my name on the marquee but once the show starts I’ll stay back behind of Buddy.

Buddy, is it a two-way street?
BG: It’s so nice to be invited to hang out here. The type of blues we play is being so ignored by airplay and so on. At one point, I thought it was that the blues lyrics weren’t connecting with kids. Then I heard rap, and I figure no, it wasn’t the lyrics. But every once in awhile, a kid like this comes along and gives the music such a life. We all benefits, so I guess it is a two-way street. When young people come up and around you, it just puts this fire under you. The Stevies and the Hendrixes did that. This guy here is fire and he’s so into what he’s doing.


But when John plays “Come Back to Bedâ€￾ that’s not the blues you know.
BG: Before the ‘60s, we didn’t have all these different types of music. Back then, everything was M-U-S-I-C. And they called it R&B and that was it. That’s when they branded the cities: Chicago, Motown, Memphis. But back in the days with Fats and Chuck, everything was just know as R&B, so I don’t care too much about labels.

Do you think John benefits having you around?
BG: You know, when they come along like that, they don’t need me. Life goes on and on. Then kids come back and say, “Wait a minute I wanna do something with youâ€￾ and it makes your hair stand up on end. A lot of those old blues cats they didn’t stand by each other much. Muddy did for me, but so many didn’t have much time for me as a youngster.

You were lucky to play blues when you did, because if you were to start as a blue artist today, you’d have an impossible time, no matter how much talent you brought.
BG: Yes, I would say so. Remember now, the electric guitar was criticized when Muddy first went to England with it, and [he] got booed. The next time he went he left it behind and fans said, “wait a minute, we want you to play it!!â€￾ It’s the same thing now. You never know what the doctor wants. I'm just glad I'm not starting out right now!
JM: I remember reading a quote of yours about what kind of advice you’d give to young players, and you said “just have the guitar in your hands and keep in it your hands all the timeâ€￾
BG: You know, John, I followed that advice because when I first started, I didn’t know the first thing about guitar. I don’t even know how to tune it. Sometimes, when I was young, I would put the guitar down for a few weeks, and then- you know how you lose your calluses?- I’d pick it back up and it’d hurt again, and I use to get angry and walk off like “ah, f***!â€￾ That’s not gonna help you. You gotta keep it in your hands. One day my sister and my brother ran me out of the house and on the way out I took my guitar with three string on it with me. I laid down on the woodpile under the sun and fell asleep. A little while later, I woke up and had a John Lee Hooker’s “Boogie Chillenâ€￾ going on it. I looked at my left hand, and I had it clamped there- because that’s all he did. How did I learn that in my sleep? But I was afraid to stop, because I didn’t know if I could pick that thing up again. I ran to every first cousin that i had – and some of them a mile away- playing that tune. Just kept walking. Lord, I’ll never forget that, because I did it for about six hours!
JM: I do that the 2004 way. I find something I like, and I don’t wanna take my hands off it or it’s gone. So I hold it there and call my cell phone and leave a message with my notes. If you don’t its like writing your name in the sand only to have water wash it away.

At Irving plaza later that night Mayer towers over Buddy, but in physical stature only. Guy launches his patented licks, assaulting the audience with violent shower of blues sparks from his polka-dotted Stratocaster. As the same time, Mayer searches the next, as if to say, “there’s got to be some way that I can keep pace. If I can just…find...the..right...note..â€￾ Together they tackle Jimi’s Red Houseâ€￾ Muddy’s Hoochie Coochie Manâ€￾, and Stevie Ray tunes like “Cold Shotâ€￾ and “Lennyâ€￾, which makes sense, considering they’ve got SRV’s former backing band, Double Trouble- Tommy Shannon and Chris Layton- as the rhythm section.

Mayer stumbles as first, and you momentary sense his unworthiness. But soon enough his patience is rewarded, as a flurry of crisp-toned, fluent notes come tumbling out of his fingers in a spontaneous yet decisive shapes. The girls squeal. Guy smiles approvingly. Guy’s own “damn right I got the bluesâ€￾ finds the legend reaching deep for pivotal title vocal line. On Mayer’s “Come Back To Bedâ€￾, while Mayer quietly implores a hurt lover to tip-toe gently back under the covers, Guy puts his own spin on the chorus line, growling, “Get back to bed, women!â€￾ inciting a round of good-humored hoots. As the night progress, Mayer clearly gains confidence. It may be 30 more years before he seasons fully, the way Buddy Guy has, but it’s only a matter of much shorter time before Mayer inches closer to crossing the blues over to his open minded pop audience.

Last night John, you seemed to be searching for direction a little, but towards the end of the show, you grew more natural and fluid.
JM: You give me six more shows with Buddy, and I’ll show you how it’s done!
BG: You give me six more jobs and I’ll be there!

Even though you’ve only shared the stage a few time, what have you picked up from Buddy as a player?
JM: I’ve learned his abandon, when you get to the point where nothing else matters. Lately, when I’ve played with Buddy, I’ve found myself going back and you can hear me though the microphone, going, ‘Aaaah!!’ It’s not like ‘hmmmm, how can I be more like Buddy?’ it’s more like seeing how I can connect with an audience faster and better, like Buddy [does]. And part of that is that sense of abandon. Also, in terms of meaning what he’s playing. Sometimes when I'm up there I still fll into playing shapes. But last night I fell into just playing.

Buddy, what do you think about John’s playing? How does he inspire you as a musician?
BG: When I first met B.B. King, I said “I don’t want to learn from you by playing, I want to learn from watching.â€￾ When he played, I loved to just sit there and watch. I tried to figure it out, which is hard for me to do. John’s a guy I would love to watch all the time. Don’t forget I'm overjoyed to play with him, but in the blues there’s what we call “stealin' licksâ€￾ And even as far back as we go when [John and I] played together at “Austin City Limits,â€￾ I was watching him and thinking, “Now what the heck is he doing there now?’

John, you’ve moved pretty successfully from the more demonstrated playing of your past to the mainstream. And now, with buddy, you seem to be moving back or paying tribute to your guitar past.
JM: My goal, if I have one, is to break it all down to just “playingâ€￾. It doesn’t matter what you play, it’s just that you’re playing. When you have a successful song—and, by the way the last thing I’ll ever do is to say I'm sorry I ever had a successful song—it’s music, and that’s all it is. Maybe it’s “Your body is A Wonderland, or maybe it’s “Damn right I’ve got the blues, “Giant Stepsâ€￾ or anything. My hope is that someday people will looked back on what I’ve played and say, “Oh yeah, he never was categorized; he decided to do something different all the timeâ€￾ I don’t want to ever have people be too sure about what I do. I don’t want to get to the point where everybody agrees on me. You’d think that, that would define success. But that’s when you’re over, when everyone agrees your great- even if your are great. I don’t want people to say, “he plays pop musicâ€￾, and have that be the bottom line. Yeah, I'm that, too. But its just music. I’ve been lucky to pick up on guys like Buddy and Stevie and Hendrix and Robert Gray and Albert King, and study them. When it come time to make a song, I don’t pull my hair out. It can be pop, blues 6/8 soul- a cheesy ballad. But each one is just a tune.

The mainstream of music is so narrow right now. I'm kind of cautious when I talk about it, because I'm part of the mainstream, but it’s true. More then ever, it’s so narrow. It always takes a host, somebody to point to the speakers and say “listen to meâ€￾. You don’t always discover music on your own.

The thing about music is, it’s here for anybody, and everyone. Whether you have big, beautiful, fake breast and dance around with a microphone that may as well be there, or you’re sitting on the edge of the stage with a guitar, it’s all music. The point is, everybody is welcome. I just wish there was more of people staying in there rooms a little longer—you know, shifting the balance back to more mature sounds—before coming out and trying to play music. They way fame game works no, by the time you’re 14 and know a few chords, you can land a record deal. In the ‘80s, with hair metal, you had this cheesy music, but at least they could sit and practice for six hours a day? I'm not saying get rid of anything. Whether you’re Buddy Guy or some guy who gets together with buddies over the weekend to play Taylors and Martins, I guarantee you they love it as much as we do. Whether you’re playing in front of thousands of people or you take your guitar out of your case on a Sunday afternoon after your bills are paid, it’s all good.

Speaking of acoustic, Buddy, when you got reacquainted with yours on your last album, was that a difficult switch?
BG: No, the acoustic was not difficult. The only difficult part was that they wouldn’t let me use a pick in the studio. Twelve hours a day, down Mississippi at the studio—oh, man, those fingers were sore so bad after the 15ht day. Every time I got ready to make a track, they cut the air conditioning off. One day the engineer looked at me and I told him “don’t stop until I stop playingâ€￾ My fingers were so bad, I had to do 29 takes of one song, and I didn’t have a dry spot on me.
JM: I was mesmerized by your vocals on that album, Buddy! It sounds like guitars, bass, trumpet, and drums, all at once. Buddy’s pitch is pristine, like a bell. You don’t hear guys talk about pitch much, but Buddy’s right on all the time, even though blues is just notes and talking. How many hours of notes do you think you’ve played in your lifetime?
BG: That’s like trying to figure out how many miles you’ve travel over the course of a career.
JM: Have you ever read that book about you, Damn Right I Got the Blues?
BG: I looked at it, but you know something John, one thing that I never do is listen to myself. I like to learn things when I listen, but if I listen to my own records, I don’t learn anything. I go that down. Let me listen to someone I can learn form .
JM: Do you get turned off when you watch guys play, and they don’t have it?
BG: If I listen to a guy that don’t have it, I try to get my mind around what he’s trying to do. And by the time I do that and see where he’s goin’, I think I can take something form him—if it isn’t but one single lick. Doesn’t matter what else he’d been up to till then; I just want that lick.
JM: You must have heard so many players that didn’t move you over the years.
BG: I don’t know, John. Insofar as the slid, I knew this guy Earl Hooker. I ran into that guy in Chicago and watch him, and in less than five minutes I said, “I don’t know who you are, but you can have my slide, because I’ll never be able to do thatâ€￾.
I heard him on a Muddy record, on a song about a little bird [“Canary Birdâ€￾], and I knew as soon as I heard it, it wasn’t Muddy playing that slide; it was Earl. He wasn’t clicking’ the frets or nothing and he was playing a strat. I'm sayin’ to him, “Man what are you doin?â€￾.
JM: I can’t play slide at all.
BG: I tried it. But you have to really work at it. Be Patient.
JM: Here’s the thing with slide: You have to be patient and relearn the guitar, but at any second, you can just slip the thing off your finger and go back to playing regular. It’s not like learning how to something different. I buy slides twice a year. But either it doesn’t fit or I can’t decide which figure to put it on. I just flip it off and forget it.
I’ve found that it’s a lot easier to learn something once people life you have already figured it out. People like Buddy are the inventers. Once it’s invented, any one can learn the technical aspect of it. That’s why I left blues music and went to pop, because I didn’t feel like there was anything new to invent. I use to go to open mic jams and people use to come to and say, “Dude you play just like Stevie Ray Vaughan!â€￾ I though I was really into something, but then I picked up a Kenny Wayne Shepherd CD, and I got scared, like, omgigod, I'm not the only one doing thisâ€￾. Then I heard Johnny Lang, too “I'm too late,â€￾ I said. There was nothing we to be done. Anybody can play last night’s lotto numbers. Guys like Buddy picked the winning numbers. My calling is to invent more, and come up with more, and I can’t do it in the blues.

Is it tough to stay motivated these days Buddy?
BG: When I go to the stage, I forget about myself. You look out, and you feel there ain’t but fine people who care what I'm, playing but I owe ‘em everything I got. My parents use to tell me something. As a matter of fact, it was the last thing they me before they passed way. They said, “Son, you don’t ever have to be the best in town. Just give it your best until the best comes around.â€￾ Some nights I don’t play well, sh** man, and I wish I could walk off the stage. But people thought enough to miss sleep and come out to see me. When you leave, you might think I'm not that good, but you know I gave my best.
JM: You can forget that too. You can forget all those people had your ticket on their dresser for two months and counted down the days to the show. There was a point there I forgot that, when going onstage was something to do in between video games. So to shake that, I hid out and watch people come into my shows, and saw how excited they were. This is everybody’s Friday night; they bought new outfits, put extra perfume on. When I go to shows, I like to see the players’ gear beforehand, all lined up on the stage. I'm like, “That’s the guitar I love!, He’s gonna play that tonight.â€￾ Or “There’s the guitar from that live concert I saw on TVâ€￾. Your time on stage is one part of many for people who come to see you; there are limos, taxis, dinners, and dates. And you realize you’ve got to give those people everything, because they’re sacrificing a lot just to see you.

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Postby justins bubbles » Fri Apr 09, 2004 1:51 pm

<span style='color:blue'>Holy shiit that was long. :blink:

Uh...summary anyone? :lol:</span>

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Postby renee » Sat Apr 10, 2004 5:44 pm

Uh...summary anyone?
:unsure: uh, no way....the summary would even be too long.....

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Postby tendertoes » Sat Apr 10, 2004 7:04 pm

Uh...summary anyone?  




<span style='color:purple'> :laughup: :rofl:
You guys read my mind...lmao!!!
The worst part is that I'll eventually read it!!!
</span>

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Postby JT Fan Girl » Mon Apr 12, 2004 6:49 am

This one's a little shorter :lol:...

Rolling Stone
Issue 626, May 2004-04-11
p54-55

Tour Preview: A Show for the Heart
John Mayer
John Mayer’s back already? Following sell-out shows late last year, the Manhattan Smoothy is back playing the main stage. Meanwhile, the busiest man in showbiz is branching into new areas of entertainment: music columnist and possible American Idol host. By Simon Wooldridge.

Believe it, John Mayer means it, the celebrated so-good-it-hurts face-pulling he uses whenever he slips from his easy-listening, acoustic pop-persona into the pentatonic scale-loving, blues improv-dude is not just for show. He even makes those faces when locked away in the rehearsal room. It’s a face that best belongs on the stage at Byron Bay’s East Coast Blues and Roots festival.
Unfortunately Mayer, who just finished a U.S. tour supporting blues legend Buddy Guy, won’t satisfy blues fans by pumping out the Stevie Ray Vaughan covers he’s so fond of in Byron. His second Australian tour begins just three days from the start of the Blues-Fest, but, unaware of the Festival, he’ll have to be satisfied with his own run of Entertainment Centre shows. Considering these dates represent a doubling in the audience size from his last Australian tour, in September 2003, he’s satisfied with his progress in Oz.
But, having toured so solidly for that six months, it’s no shock that he’s understated in his enthusiasm for the tour. “I don’t think of it as ‘I love doing this’,â€￾ he says. “I think of it as ‘I don’t mind it’. It just wouldn’t be like me to go, ‘I love doing this.’ I mean I do… It all comes down to when they ask, ‘Hey, you wanna do it again?’ and the answer is, ‘Yeah, OK’.â€￾

“Hey, you wanna do it again?â€￾ is literally the question when it comes to Australia, seeing as you toured here so recently.
Well, I’ll play to anybody who wants to hear it. When we played last time, there was some stuff that sold out pretty fast. I might start sucking when I’m in my 30s, so I’d better play to all the people who wanna hear me now.

Can you give a potential set-list of songs that you’ll play while you’re here?
I don’t think that I’m at the point in my career yet where I can afford not to play any of the song that people are really familiar with. Maybe another record down the line, when it becomes impossible to play all the songs people are incredibly familiar with, I can start tapering off some of those songs. For now, there aren’t many spots I can play with. There’s no reason I would ever take off “Why Georgiaâ€￾ from a set, because the song I’d be putting on instead would not be received as well. So it’s a little bit of growing up to someday being able to have people saying, “That was such an amazing show, and hey, he didn’t play ‘No Such Thing’.â€￾ I care too much what the audience thinks. Part of me wishes I could get up onstage and play whatever come to mind that night. But I wouldn’t enjoy it because the whole time I’d be sure that it was going over terrible.

You could always keep the familiarity level up with covers. I noticed you performed a medley of “Highway with the Dangerzoneâ€￾ and “The Heat is Onâ€￾ a few nights ago.
Oh, you know what, you’re incorrect, sir. A medley infers that you’re playing two separate songs. What we did was fuse these two beautiful songs into one amalgam. It is known as “Highway to the Danger Heat-Is-On Zoneâ€￾. It’s alchemy; it’s like science. I don’t wear a lab-coat because I’d get it dirty on the road. But I should.

Do you have any specific cover material planned for us?
I can’t just tell you. I have to figure out what kind of love-making style Australian crowds have. You know, I have to find out how Australia likes to make love. Then I’ll know all the moves that I should put on. I couldn’t write a set-list now, that would be self-defeating ‘cause I don’t know how Australia’s gonna grind on me.

You didn’t get a fair idea of that in September?
I did, but you know, every night’s different. I mean hey, I write set-lists at five o’clock every evening, and I change ‘em sometimes at eight. You try to put a piece of paper onstage where all songs on the list are ones you’re most ready to play. You have to be in you heightened state for each song in the set.

Is there any truth in the rumour that you might end up a judge on the next series of American Idol?
I’m entertained by the idea. But no one’s really asked me specifically. So until they do, it’s kinda like your grandmother creeping up to you at Christmas time with an envelope full of money. You kinda see her creeping up, but you don’t wanna pay attention to it, so you pretend to be surprised. I’ve heard grandma’s reaching to her purse, but I don’t really know, so I’m just keeping to myself on that one.

What would be your preferred caricature? Bad guy? Nice guy?
No, I would be a tough lover. I’ll tell you what you’re doing wrong. And exactly how to fix it.

What are your thoughts on the William Hung phenomenon?
It’s not really a phenomenon, it’s a quick bubble-burst. It’s like a little pop fart. It’s kitschy and it’s actually clever, you know, but people will not remember that man. It’s a pretty thin joke. A one-trick pony.

And you’re also now writing regularly for Esquire?
I’m writing a music column for Esquire now, where I’m gonna set it straight. I’m gonna iron out all those little buckles in the pop music landscape, where sometimes things unfairly get raised into superstardom and sometimes they go without being noticed. What I seek to do in the article is take one person down just a little bit, and the other person up so that they match each other. I’m like musical terra shifting.

Who have you written about so far?
The first is yet to be printed, you’ll have to pick up your copy of Esquire.

You are debuting new songs in the current tour. Anything promising?
I’ll tell you, I have As or Bs, I don’t really have total stinkers. I have songs that grow up to be big strong men, I have songs that grow up to be weaklings. I don’t have any that don’t grow up at all, you know. So I have one that’s a big strong man, and a couple of others that could maybe go together to be a big strong man. I don’t really know. That’s the fun part - starting over again. You write a record, you put it out, and your number of songs that you have, that people haven’t heard yet, drops dramatically. And you have to work again to build the stable back up again.

So what’s the next hit?
Oh, I don’t know if it’s a hit but it’s a song called ‘Hummingbird’. And it feels good.


John Mayer Set List
Taken from John Mayer’s most recent show in Pensacola, Florida, March 3rd.
“Why Georgiaâ€￾, “Clarityâ€￾, “Something’s Missingâ€￾, “Wheelâ€￾, “My Stupid Mouthâ€￾, “Bigger Than My Bodyâ€￾, “Daughtersâ€￾, “No Such Thingâ€￾, “Hummingbirdâ€￾, “Your Body Is A Wonderlandâ€￾, “Come Back To Bedâ€￾, “83â€￾.
Encore: “St Patrick’s Dayâ€￾, “Highwayâ€￾, “Only Heartâ€￾.

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Postby justins bubbles » Mon Apr 12, 2004 3:03 pm

<span style='color:blue'>I'm horrible. :no: I don't want to read anything. :shrug:</span>

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Postby JT Fan Girl » Mon Apr 12, 2004 3:05 pm

You want a summary? :lol: I'll do it, I'm bored. :(

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Postby lancechica4 » Mon Apr 12, 2004 7:25 pm

Oh Claire! :hug: I will read it. Once I get a second... :lol:

Here's some news...
I will be partying Mraz-style on May 20th! :yay: :ph34r:

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Postby tendertoes » Mon Apr 12, 2004 7:54 pm

<span style='color:purple'>Woohoo K-2!!
I just read the last one and well I can't wait for more of John!!!</span>

I would be a tough lover. I’ll tell you what you’re doing wrong. And exactly how to fix it.



:chatter: :chew: :lick: :drool: :nod: :thumbup: :whip: :pimp: sperm :safesex:

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Postby lancechica4 » Mon Apr 12, 2004 8:08 pm

Aww, that intimidates me. :( :lol:

Although, I don't think he'd have anything to fix with me. B) :lol: ... (:huh:)

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Postby tendertoes » Mon Apr 12, 2004 8:57 pm

<span style='color:purple'> :rofl: :laughup:

Isn't it exciting to think of him as a tough lover.... :whip:
We could always pretend to be bad students...wink wink!!
</span>

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Postby JT Fan Girl » Thu Apr 15, 2004 2:08 pm

More news :yay: = more reading ;)

:lol:

John Mayer on Heavier Things and other Weighty Topics
Submitted By: Carla Boyadjian


The following quotes were gathered from a conversation with the artist that took place on the band tour bus in mid-July prior to a concert in Irvine, Calif.

On the emotional difference between the two albums: "Room for Squares was a lot dreamier, a lot more hopeful - hopeful being a lieu of having any experience. Heavier Things is a response to experience."

On the environmental inspiration for the album: "You'll never read an interview with me complaining about how much work I have to do. It's a new fad to try and garner sympathy from people after a month in the limelight. I certainly didn't want to make a record about the road - it's not about lighting trusses and beer-stained carpets. In fact, this record is incredibly domestic. Rather than write about my experiences on a bus, they're projected into what I sometimes wish I had - of being in a house. Every song on this record has a place. It's a very neighborhood, domestic kind of record, because it was written mostly in my apartment. These songs were written and recorded having owned a car and driving to my parent's house on Sundays. There's a song called "Home Life" - I almost called the album Home Life, it was that important."

On the meaning of the album title: "Sometimes titles - handles for things - just arise and that's it. Sometimes an idea calls itself finished before you're really able to reason with it. When I hear the record, I just think Heavier Things. When people hear the record, I think they'll understand. I still feel very much like I'm at the beginning of a stage in my life. When I hear the record back, I hear a certain articulation. I wasn't able to achieve before because I'm a little older now - a little older and a little smarter. Room for Squares has quite a nice rainbow effect musically for me, and I think I needed to put a record out that was a rainbow. It was like, "Look at all these colors that I can bring". Heavier Things is less of a Whitman's Sampler and a bit more into a theme. Instead of being wondrous, it's more experienced."

The first take is the deepest: "Looking back on it now, it was an absolute blessing that there was no time to rethink anything, because the one thing about this record that is completely consistent is that everything you hear is the first idea. All I wanted to do was go from the gut, put my music down, sing it, and record it. There is no plan B for any of these songs. Everything you hear on this record is very much like the first time I sang it. Whenever I went to a second idea and tried to improve something, I went "No, no, it's lost." A lot of the components were recorded in my apartment - so you're actually hearing the first time I took my finger to a string and laid an idea out."

On providing the new material with breathing space: "By the time I recorded 'No Such Thing' it had changed. This is the inverse of that. By the time I get this music on stage and play it for a year, it will have changed. But it allows me to grow. I think of it as a computer with a whole bunch of upgrade slots. With a lot of these songs, the rim of the top of the cup is a lot higher than what I've done with the songs on the record so that I can keep adding on stage. I can play these songs on stage and look around in between some of my parts. I can breathe, I can think, I can ad-lib. It's basically building your own improv."

A useful analogy: "There aren't so many chords, not so many places I have to be at every second, on this record. So I can put my things down in a measure and let my singing and lungs breathe, my guitar playing breathe. It's like building a house with an addition, but not moving into the addition yet."

On the album package: "We use a lot of statistics in the package. I got the idea from my habit of constantly writing album lists - like, "If I put an album out today, what would be on it?" And I thought it would be cool to fill it up with as many statistics as I could come up with about the record: tempos, keys, where the songs were written, keywords, like 'sunny', 'defiant', 'promissory', and 'quizzical'. We're in the Information Age; I just want to let people find the humor in that much information."

On keeping things simple: "Sometimes you feel like there is this assumed level of difficulty around you; I'm inspired by lowering that assumed level of difficulty down to next to zero. Get it down to "Man records onto tape. Tape goes to record company. Record company puts it out on the shelf". A lot of time, you assume that it's going to have to be more difficult than it is. There were moments on the record when I was reminded how liberating it can be to just reduce it down to nothing. Someone puts a microphone in front of you, and you do your thing, which really is not a thoughtful process; it's a thoughtless process."

On meeting the expectations of his fans: "People ask if I'm pressured with this record. Yeah, you know, I'm pressured to write this many songs in this short a period of time. The first record felt completely calibrated and true to what I felt. When it came out, it resonated with people; I can't take responsibility for that. So the second time, I have to kind of just as fearlessly go in with the idea of making exactly what I want to make. This is what I do, and I'm not so scared with that I'll never be able to do it again. When I write a song about daughters, I'm doing it because I have to, because I need to, not because I need to fulfill a requirement. So that's the fun of putting this record out. The question is, "Is what I love what other people love?" Maybe someday that's going to fall out of sync and then back into sync again."

On his job as an artist: "My real responsibility is to stay true enough to myself to let it happen on its own, not to get in my own way and think about what people might want to hear. My job is to shut off the outside world enough to let myself breathe and do what comes naturally, what's in my blood. What is not natural is saying, 'I really want to impress people right now'. That's a terrible place to write from. Every time I've ever gotten up out of a chair frustrated and grabbing my hair, it was because I sat down for the wrong reason. I sat down and said, 'God, I want another song.' That's like saying, 'God, I want another girlfriend.'"

Why he does it: "You get in front of a microphone, you've got stuff to say - not because you want to put another song on the plastic that's gonna come out in the store; you say it because you have to get it out, and you can't get it out any other way."

On the notion of continuity: "There's nothing to reinvent, no rethinking, no retooling, no updating. It's just more; it's just continued. People always want to see one record as the calling card, and anything that happens after that record is a giant leap or a transition, or an experimental phase. No, it's not. What if you knew nothing? What if it's just the way it falls? You make a record, and you're not done, so you put another 10 songs out, and I'm not done with that, either."

On keeping his head on straight: "I don't feel like I've got to squeeze from the bottom of the tube to get anything out. It's just a trust in yourself that you don't really have to worry too much. All I have to do is not lose my head, not lose who I am as a person, and live my life."

On the critical reaction to his work: "I've got a lot of time, and I don't need to be the hippest thing in my day. Give me an inch, and I'll make the most of it; give me another inch, and I'll make the most of that. I have a problem with being handed things too early, anyway. I have a lot to prove and a lot of time, and that's a wonderful combination. You don't like this one? I'll make another one."

A final analogy: "By the time this hits the record shelf, it will be like a Krispy Kreme Donut. There should still be steam visible at the top if, because it's that new."

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Postby JT Fan Girl » Thu Apr 15, 2004 2:08 pm

John Mayer at the North Shore Events Centre

15.04.2004 By REBECCA BARRY
It would be easy to pan John Mayer based on the fact his Grammy-winning first album was called Room For Squares.

Sure, he's a bit preppy, arriving on stage in a pressed, pink-striped shirt with a band you might associate with your high school's jazz group (I was in one once) and partaking in moves your drunk uncle at a wedding might confuse with dancing.

When he plays, his legs twitch as though they're about to give way, his head wobbles on his body like one of those toy dogs in the back of a taxi and his mouth contorts into all sorts of grotesque shapes.

"Gene Simmons I am not," he quips, pretending he's about to flick his guitar pick into the crowd, then handing it sensibly to someone in the first row.

And yet Mayer is surprisingly cool.

He commands the stage the way the former US President might smoke a cigar - a clean-cut momma's boy with dangerous intent.

That huge, husky voice breezes through his two albums-worth of his all-American hits, jollying up the everywoman's dream song, Your Body is A Wonderland with snippets of Prince, and Neon, a la the Beatles.

Then he breaks into the kind of stuff that would make your momma blush.

He really is quite the bluesman, playing the guitar as though it's been strapped to his groin from birth, wringing out the notes until they yelp like a lost puppy, losing himself in countless hedonistic rock'n'roll moments and always taking the audience along for the ride.

"It's not hard to imagine him having sex," remarked someone nearby, which said it all as he fumbled over his instrument daringly close to the edge of the stage. This, Mayer explained later, was just "crazy, ridiculous stuff".

"This," he said of a song he wrote with veteran blues player Buddy Guy, "is the kind of music I want to write more of."

He should, as it was those poignant blues moments, jamming out with his band, that showed what a fantastic musician he really is.

And what a laugh.

"Don't cut your hair above your shoulders," he sings goodbye - a song he must have written about going on tour and leaving a girlfriend behind (maybe the recently bob-haired Jennifer Love-Hewitt?).

A truly passionate musician with a sense of humour, a lack of ego and the balls to wear pink is a rare and wonderful thing. Shirts off to John Mayer

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Postby JT Fan Girl » Thu Apr 15, 2004 2:13 pm

One more thing :P ...

John got an award for Why Georgia at the "BDS Certified Spin Awards".

John is in Billboard magazine, 4.17.2004 issue,
"John Mayer Tries Hand At New Instrument"
John Mayer will bow a monthly music column in Esquire, beginning with the June issue. "It's starting as a third of a page of commentary, and I'm hoping I can work up to a page, " the Columbia Records artist says. "It's about one record a month, about the music. The Esquire reader doesn't want to know about units." Mayer, who says his publicist Angelica Cob secured him the post after he expressed a desire to pen a column, has already had his first bout of writer's block. "When I went to write the first column, I got really freaked out," he says. "But then I discovered it's not so hard." Just wait, is all we have to say.

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Postby tendertoes » Thu Apr 15, 2004 8:35 pm

<span style='color:purple'>I actually read all of that!! I love his warped little mind!!!
Damn I can't wait until August!!!
THanks Claire!
</span>

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Postby justins bubbles » Thu Apr 15, 2004 10:32 pm

:wacko:

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Postby JT Fan Girl » Sun Apr 18, 2004 11:30 am

I'm sorry Bubs! :lol: Look away now...

Middle management
April 17, 2004 Bland, badass or a four-hit wonder? George Palathingal meets John Mayer.

From the moment he dully intones "Hello", it's obvious that John Mayer wishes he was somewhere else. On stage playing his beloved guitar, perhaps. Or maybe anywhere but on stage.

The cherubic 26-year-old singer-songwriter has been on tour almost constantly since his first visit to Australia in 2002, when only the hardiest pop-dodger might not have fallen for the infuriatingly infectious single No Such Thing ("I wanna run through the halls of my high school/I wanna scream from the top of my lungs").

That year, Mayer played the 1200-capacity Metro Theatre.

Last September, he sold out the considerably bigger Hordern Pavilion. For this, his third Australian tour in two years, he has graduated to the humungous Sydney Entertainment Centre.

"Yeah, we're doin' arenas," he says from a military school in West Point, New York, where, predictably, he and his band are performing that night. "It's goin' great. I found a real groove out here on the road this time. It's holdin' up as something really fun to do."

Do you find the show loses intimacy at bigger venues? Wouldn't you rather play a mini-residency at a smaller venue?

"A crowd can still get quiet; you can still play quiet, and you can get ... bigger, y'know? I mean, 10,000 people screaming in front of you makes the music really just stand up on tippy-toes."

For the past eight months, the MOR blues-pop of Mayer's second major-label album, Heavier Things, has been doing its darndest to rule the airwaves in the way its predecessor did.

That album, Room for Squares, featured the sweet, Grammy-winning Your Body is a Wonderland as well as No Such Thing. Momentum has continued for Mayer with the current album thanks to its hook-filled lead single Bigger than My Body and, more recently, the dreamy Clarity.

Mayer used to get No Such Thing out of the way early in the set because he wanted audiences to know there was, as he has proved, more to him. "Well, yeah, it's just being defiant," he admits of this penchant for quickly dispensing with his would-be albatross. "Music is about being defiant. It's like, 'If you want it, here it is.' I was also scared sh**less that I was only gonna be the one-hit wonder, so ... at least now I'm, like, a four-hit wonder."

Also, thanks to his clean-cut good looks, polished musical skills and easy-on-the-ear sounds, Mayer has attained the holy grail of demography: people of all ages - and both sexes - seem to be buying gig tickets and records in droves.

"There are women who go to shows who wanna watch me sing to 'em, they wanna watch me in person," he acknowledges, squirming slightly. "There are guys who go and wanna watch me play guitar and hear the guitar solos ... Y'know, it's like, I'm doin' only one thing. It's just it's being received in a lot of different ways by people. I think that's fantastic."

Critics, however, have been less easy to win over. Reviewing Mayer's Hordern Pavilion show, I was impressed with the musicianship and entertained by the performance, but personally found the music often just that bit too bland to be truly satisfying. Does Mayer care what critics think?

"Um, sure," he says. "I mean, I would love everyone to agree ... that I'm badass. But I don't have, like, that traditional good guy-bad guy relationship with the critics. I think it's fine. I think it's music and it inspires people to have thoughts about it and they can write whatever they want about it. I get inspired by critics sometimes."

The word "badass" wouldn't be the first to come to my mind to describe you.

"Well, it depends what kind of badass you're lookin' at. If you're lookin' at badass, like, all in one lump sum in front of you on a video, no. That's OutKast - that's people who get up on TV and that's their thing.

"Badass for me is, like, 'You can't f--- with me 'cause I'm not goin' away.' It's almost as if you have to add it up at the end of the day and then you go, 'That's kinda badass.' Y'know?"

What about critics who have issues with you that seem more to do with that murky concept of "cool"? The staff of SPIN magazine recently voted you worst solo artist.

"Oh really? Whoa. So you're asking me ... how I feel about somebody telling me that I'm the worst solo artist?"

Yes, but only because I don't believe their assessment is based purely on your music.

There's a long pause.

"Oh, y'know, I have no idea," Mayer says calmly. "It doesn't really offend or put me off. I mean, I understand my place in the world, let's put it that way. I'm never gonna be as cool as the White Stripes - I get it. So, I mean, in that sense, it doesn't keep me up at night."

John Mayer plays the Sydney Entertainment Centre on Saturday.




Grammy winner thinks big
Emma Chalmers
16apr04

HE'S a Grammy-winning singer/songwriter and has sold three million of his albums worldwide. That equates to enough fame for John Mayer's liking.

"Success you always want more of, but I think when it comes to fame I think I've got it good enough," Mayer said yesterday. "I think I don't have to wake up mega famous and go 'get me out of here' to realise that I don't think I'd like to wake up mega famous."
But the 25-year-old American, who last night performed at the Brisbane Entertainment Centre, might have to get used to a few more fans as his career continues, if his Australian precedent is anything to go by.

Mayer's rise to the top of the charts and top billing at the Entertainment Centre comes after working his way through Brisbane's other concert venues.

He played his first gig in Brisbane at the Tivoli two years ago, then graduated to the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre and last night he hit the big time at Boondall where he performed to a crowd of about 4000.

"It's really cool," he said.

"I like the idea of always being on some kind of an incline. Whether or not that's record sales or even touring the touring numbers I just like being on the up."

Mayer's career got its kickstart in 2001 when he released his debut album Room For Squares, home to the hit Your Body is a Wonderland, for which he earned a Grammy for best pop vocal performance.

His next album Heavier Things, released last year, fed off the slowburn success of its predecessor and its first single, Bigger Than My Body, was the most-played song on Australian radio for four weeks in 2003.

Although many artists speak of second album jitters, Mayer said Heavier Things was instinctive.

"The easier producing music feels, the easier it is – the harder you make it, the harder it becomes," he said.

Much of Mayer's success has been attributed to his old-fashioned marketing approach of incessant touring.

Mayer estimates he is on the road for 10½ months a year and says he has mixed feelings about touring. "I do it cause I have to. I curse having to be on the road every single day and I get home and I get excited about going back out," he said.

I know I can't wait either Tash! :yay: But at the same time I don't think it's really hit me yet, but wait til I get to the venue... they'll be butterflies in my tummy when I'm actually THERE... breathing the same air as John. :lol:

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Postby tendertoes » Mon Apr 19, 2004 8:21 am

they'll be butterflies in my tummy when I'm actually THERE... breathing the same air as John.


<span style='color:purple'>*sqeaul* DO you think poor John has any idea what he has gotten himself into???</span>

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Postby lancechica4 » Tue Apr 20, 2004 7:57 am

Let's hope not. We don't want him to realize and then stop. :lol:

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Postby JT Fan Girl » Thu Apr 22, 2004 12:20 pm

:lol:

I know nobody likes to read lots :lol:... so for a rainy day I guess :shrug:...

Ironic lyrics to radio-ready guitar pop

Reviewer Andrew Murfett
April 22, 2004
JOHN MAYER
Rod Laver Arena, April 19

When John Mayer played a modest showcase to a handful of industry personnel a couple of years ago, few would have believed that the New York-based singer-songwriter would be playing arenas one studio-album later. A combination of potently ironic lyrics and several hook-laden, radio-ready guitar-pop songs have given the 26-year-old a strong enough following to do so within two years.

Mayer and his band have played hundreds of shows together and demonstrate a palpable cohesiveness. They opened boldly with his best song, Clarity, and unflinchingly followed it up with his biggest hit, No Such Thing. For a guy without many hits, it was a typically audacious move.

Paradoxically, as Mayer sang, "Today I finally overcame trying to fit the world inside a picture frame" during 3x5 - a song that refutes the theory that everything needs to be captured on film - hundreds of flashes bounced around the arena. In a nice (yet ironic) touch, Mayer took a camera from one of his fans in the front row, returned to the stage and took pictures of himself with each member of the band and handed back the camera to his ecstatic fan.

While he primarily writes pop songs, Mayer is obviously inspired by blues and jazz artists. More importantly, Monday's show proved he is also a skilful musician.

The unbearable heaviness of being
April 16, 2004

John Mayer's Zeitgeisty songs and "heavy" sound have won him chart success and music industry respect, writes Andrew Murfett.

You could be forgiven for thinking John Mayer is a geek. Indeed, on the surface, that seems to be the case. The 26-year-old singer-songwriter is a star, yet rejects many of the celebrity perks. He doesn't drink, smoke or do any sort of drugs ("besides caffeine"). They don't really interest him.

Yet flashy hip-hop stars such as Jay-Z and the Neptunes' Pharrell Williams heap praise on Mayer's blend of rock and soul. He was even invited to (and attended) the launch party for hot new hip-hop artist Kanye West's album in New York earlier this year.

But if you think about it - and Mayer has - it makes sense. Much of his recent music is centred around beats and rhythms. His latest single, Clarity, is a case in point. Its instrumental mix is marked by snappy loops, far removed from anything Mayer previously committed to tape.

He smiles, recalling the song. "I think this record (his last studio album, Heavier Things) was interesting in that there was never any big concept. I had developed this (he animatedly demonstrates, complete with thigh slaps and claps) and I really thought it was so heavy and I had never done anything like that before. I had just wanted to put the jazz side to it. It was inspired by the (r'n'b singer) D'Angelo thing. The way you put a beat down, you put horns over it, you put a bass line. But the fun part is how you would sing over it.

"You just add things and keep building. It's less guy-with-a-notepad-and-tape-recorder and more guy-just-layering sh**, seeing where it goes."

Mayer, who was born in Connecticut and is now based in New York, studied at Boston's Berklee College of Music and began to be noticed as a singer-songwriter in 2001 after moving to Atlanta, a city renowned for its alternative acoustic club scene.

Most of his debut independent EP, the predominantly acoustic Inside Wants Out, was re-recorded and newer material added for what became his debut album for Sony, Room For Squares.

While his rise seems to have been swift, Mayer's success came after years on the road with little reward.

Clearly, the hard work has paid off, culminating in a Grammy Award last year. Typically, he's dismissive of the honour.

"I keep it on the mantle (at home) and I'm not really in that room very much. I always look everywhere else in the room and then I'm like, 'Oh, there it is'."

Unlike much of the fare played on commercial radio, Mayer's records have a subversive lyrical bent. He articulates the feelings of his generation. His fans not only feel like they get his music, they feel like they get him. As his vocal trails off at the end of the Heavier Things track Something's Missing, Mayer slyly sings: "How come everything I think I need always comes with batteries?/What do you think it means?"

It points to the general lyrical theme of the album: a generation that has everything materially, yet still feels insecure and dissatisfied.

"Given the trends," he says, "there must be other people who feel exactly as I feel - less joy, less experience and intellect, more material. My generation is the 'F--- the vacation, give me the cash equivalent' generation. I find that if I have (less experience) in my life, I make up for that lack of experience with items.

"I think sometimes when I want to shop all the time, really what I want to be doing is resting or spending time with people. It's kind of like putting all your faith in things, solid things, and becoming let down by that day after day."

Some of Mayer's success can be attributed to the cynicism that permeates much of his work.

"It's funny - one song can be incredibly sardonic and the other one really romantic. These are all songs that I still feel, and the refreshing thing is getting up on stage now and singing things to people that you would actually say to them if you had a conversation with them."

Mayer confirms that although his songs are "genuine", there's another side most will never see.

"There's a certain disenfranchisement that I think a lot of people feel. I feel it a lot, too, but the misconception is that I feel these things all the time. I don't. These are the results of feelings I have in 20-minute increments."

With his success, any previous financial constraints have been eliminated. Unlike many other successful musicians, though, Mayer hasn't had a long-lost second cousin come looking for him with their hand out.

"I know that it should have happened by now," he says. "Everybody tells me it's coming but it hasn't happened."

Does he still look at the prices of things such as petrol or food?

"No. Do you look at gas prices?"

I guess . . .

"Well, before all this I never looked at gas prices. I mean, you've got to fill your car up anyway."

Heavier Things gave Mayer his first No.1 album in the US. How did he celebrate? "Sushi," he says with a laugh. "Really good sushi."

John Mayer plays at Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne Park, on Monday night. Heavier Things is out through Sony.

17 days til John. :jawdrop:

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Postby megzrsa » Thu Apr 22, 2004 1:54 pm

"I keep it on the mantle (at home) and I'm not really in that room very much. I always look everywhere else in the room and then I'm like, 'Oh, there it is'."

:lol:
Claire you lucky thing! :nod:

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Postby justins bubbles » Thu Apr 22, 2004 5:57 pm

:whistle:

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Postby lancechica4 » Thu Apr 22, 2004 6:51 pm

I read it! I read it! :dance:

CLAIRE, SO SOOOON! :o

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Postby renee » Fri Apr 23, 2004 9:01 am

claire i can't wait for you to see him....i'm so excited for you :)

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Postby justins bubbles » Fri Apr 23, 2004 6:25 pm

<span style='color:blue'>Claire that's SO close!! :yay: I'm sure it will be worth the wait. :nod:</span>

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Postby lancesgrl » Tue Apr 27, 2004 11:54 am

i'm SO happy john is finally getting over to see you, claire!!! :yay: i guess he really DOES listen to me while we're having sex. :P

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Postby justins bubbles » Tue Apr 27, 2004 4:10 pm

<span style='color:blue'>I usually can't hear myself over him... :yell:</span>



B) :lol:

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Postby tendertoes » Wed Apr 28, 2004 7:28 am

<span style='color:purple'> :laughup: :rofl: </span>

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Postby JT Fan Girl » Wed Apr 28, 2004 10:38 am

:rofl:

Thanks everyone, you have no idea how excited I am :yay:... 11 days :blink: ... I can almost count the days on one hand! :wacko:

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Postby lancesgrl » Wed Apr 28, 2004 2:24 pm

:yay: claire!!!

as of now, i have NO mayer tickets.... <_< BUT.... i am in the process of bidding on a couple of great seats on ebay tho!!! :yay: so keep your fingers crossed!! :crossfingers:

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Postby lancechica4 » Wed Apr 28, 2004 6:01 pm

11 days?! :blink: God, I can't wait! :lol:

Katie, I SO hope you get them! Nay and I were PMing when L83 tickets went onsale that if we didn't hear from you soon WE were going to buy tickets for you. :lol: :hug:

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Postby justins bubbles » Wed Apr 28, 2004 9:28 pm

<span style='color:blue'>I'm going to see mah Derek in 23 days. :shrug: :lol:</span>


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