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Angelpopstar7
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Postby Angelpopstar7 » Wed Dec 15, 2004 12:32 am

ok so i had to write this paper for English and it's suppose to be like a persuasive speach and I chose my topic as "Should America's Racial Differences be Emphasized" and I took the stand point of no they shouldn't be. Our rough drafts are due tomorrow (Well technically i guess its today since its after 12 lol) and practice speaches begin on Thursday...anyways...i was wondering if you'd be so kind as to read it and let me know what you think of it...it's kinda long...ok so it's really long...i'd really appreciate it but if its just too long i understand perfectly :lol:

There is no room in a free America for racial differences in health care, job placement, as well as living conditions. Everyday, countless people are discriminated against because of their skin color and it is time for a change. It is time to change the way America looks at a person and judges them just because of their skin color. It is time to change the way America looks at a persons skin color and says ‘sorry you are not capable of completing this job.’ It is time to change the way America looks at a persons skin color says ‘Hey they will not know the difference if we place a toxic waste site here’. It is time to change the way America looks at a persons skin color and says ‘sorry, you are not good enough to receive this level of health care.’ It is time for a change America. Martin Luther King Jr., one of the greatest activists for racial equality, once stated “We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro’s basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one.â€￾ (“I Have a Dream 1). That was over 40 years ago and the quote still has great meaning today.

Society is under the misconception that once you are in the ghetto, there is no way for you to get out and that is not true at all. Some of the most successful individuals in America today are that of minorities. For example, take Sean ‘P.Diddy’ Combs, an African-American magnate in the hip-hop world. He came from ‘rags to riches’ in a sense. Most people would say that growing up in a poor Harlem neighborhood would set him back in society; however, today he is a member of an elite group of people which influence people today, but more importantly teenagers which are the future of our society. P. Diddy influences teens through his music, clothing line, and urgency to get out and vote in the 2004 presidential election. Furthermore, an influential member of the Hispanic community is that of Arturo Lewin. Coming from a second-generation clothier from Chile, most people wouldn’t give him the time of day but he has turned his knowledge into a multi-million dollar business, Art Lewin Clothiers (“Art Lewin Clothiers 3). In the year 2003 alone, Lewin earned $2.1 million (“Art Lewin Clothiers 2). At the rate he’s going at, by 2010, he’ll be earning over $10 million a year (“Art Lewin Clothiers 5). He realized that executives don’t have time to go out shopping, so he sends an employee to their house and then custom makes their suits and shirts for them (“Art Lewin Clothiers 4). Minorities aren’t just famous for their music and clothing designs though. There are many minority professional sports athletes who make millions of dollars a year just to play a sport. They’re the exact same people who are from the “ghettosâ€￾ and were told that they’d never make it in life. They’ve overcome all their trials and tribulations to do something good with their talents.

Additionally, King Jr. is quoted as saying “I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal.’â€￾ (I Have a Dream 2). That means that every single person is created equal. One man should not have to live in the slums just because of the color of his skin. Furthermore, citizens of a different race should not be treated lesser than those who have white skin. A very troubling issue has been affecting our society lately, that of environmental racism (Bullard 2). Environmental racism quite simply is when certain communities or groups of a certain color are disadvantaged through policies and/or practices (Bullard 3). A report, Political Difficulties Facing Waste-to-Energy Conversion Plant Sitting, which was put out in 1984 states that middle and upper class neighborhoods need to have a one to five mile radius away from the proposed site for the plant yet, it can be placed practically right beside a community which is of a different race (Bullard 4). Former Vice-President Al Gore is even quoted as saying “Race is the single most accurate predictor of the location of hazardous waste.â€￾ (Klinenberg 8). Why would that be? Because it is more likely to be placed near neighborhoods where minorities live? If one race is going to be affected by government policies, then all of the races should be affected equally; not just the minorities. Often times, the minority neighborhoods are chosen because of lack of education so they’ll face little to none resistance (Klinenberg 9). Tsk tsk, taking advantage of those who don not know any better. There are many examples from all of the United States where minorities are being taken advantage of. In Ward Valley, California, the Fort Mojave Indian tribe has been fighting to keep a private waste storage company from building a low level nuclear waste dump on their land (Klinenberg 1). Then in Houston, Texas, residents just learned that Gulf Oil had polluted the ground that they were living on and then sold the land to a developer in the 1960’s, not disclosing any information about the polluted ground to the developer (Klinenberg 2). Or take the outskirts of New Orleans, Louisiana, where the mostly black and poor citizens are trying to fight a major chemical company from building a toxic emitting plant in their community (Klinenberg 3). Imagine that you live in a tiny community in Covent, Louisiana, where only 2,000 people live, 80% of which are black and 43% of which are poor. Now imagine adding four substantial polluting factories in your small town; YOUR small town (Klinenberg 11). Now imagine that you are a little child living in West Oakland, California, or the South Bronx of New York City and you want to go outside and play but you can not because incinerators have taken over your neighborhoods (Klinenberg 4)? Even our own governments program, the Superfund, focuses on cleaning up white neighborhoods before neighborhoods of minorities (Klinenberg 7).

“Violence as a way of achieving racial justice is both impractical and immoral. It is impractical because it is a descending spiral ending in destruction for all. It is immoral because it seeks to humiliate the opponent rather than win his understand; it seeks to annihilate rather than covert. Violence is immoral because it thrives on hatred rather than love.â€￾ Martin Luther King Jr. is quoted as saying (Watson-“Writingsâ€￾ 1). Some of the acts created against minorities in health care can be considered violent. Not treating an individual because they are of a different skin color and you are not sure if they have insurance or not is ridiculous (Nelson 1). Who cares if the person has insurance if is a life or death situation? While we are on the topic, let us talk about how hard it is for a minority to get health insurance. Many blacks are not granted health insurance just because of the color of their skin. It does not matter what their status is in society, they could be the richest man in the world and yet, they still would have a hard time getting health insurance (Nelson 5). However, there are small cases where minorities refuse treatment, but, that still does not make up for the racial inequalities created against them (Nelson 7). It is believed by some, that if there were more doctors in minority communities, especially minority doctors, that these inequalities wouldn’t be present, but let’s face it, there is always going to be that racial barrier, even though it should not exist because all men are created equal (Nelson 6 & 8). It is merely skin pigmentations, which separate us. We are all the same on the inside. We all have one heart, two lungs, one liver, you get the picture. It’s merely the outside that is different, not the inside.

Yet another quote by Martin Luther King Jr., is still evident today. “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today.â€￾ (I Have a Dream 3). This quote can be interpreted in many different ways but when first reading, it appears that King is talking about the availability of jobs to everyone, not just one race. It is sad, that in our society, one that has supposedly come so far since the 1960’s, people of different races aren’t even called back for a job just because of their name (Krueger 6). A study was conducted in both Boston and Chicago to see whether applicants with black sounding names would have a lower chance of being called back for a job (Krueger 1 & 2). Researchers randomly assigned black sounding names as well as white sounding names to resumes with adequate credentials, making sure that no employer received the exact same resume twice (Krueger 3, 4, 5) . The results that came back were alarming. The applicants who had a white-sounding name had a 50 percent better chance of being called back for an interview (Krueger 6). With results like these, the incentives are low for African American’s to obtain job skills. Furthermore, today in New York City, the unemployment rate is that of 8.5 percent but if you break it down into races, African American’s have an unemployment rate of 12.9 percent and Hispanics have an unemployment rate of 9.6 percent (Watson “Blackâ€￾ 6). During Americas recent recession, unemployment rose dramatically. So high that only 51.8 percent of African American men between the ages of 16 and 64 were employed (Watson “Blackâ€￾ 3). Many men who were in jail are trying to turn their lives around in fact but no one is willing to give them a job. One man, Jimmy Green, commented “I ain’t a lazy person, but how can you expect people to start their lives over when no one is willing to give them a chance.â€￾ (Watson 4). He brings up a very valid point. In 2000 alone, there were 791,600 black men in prison in New York City and with many of their sentences coming to an end, the prospects of them getting a job are slim to none (Watson, 5). Furthermore, many challenges face minorities today on the job front. Hispanic men tend to have poor English so no one wants to hire them because they can’t speak English fluently (Swanson 2). Although Native Americans are known for their hard work, they have extremely high rates of unemployment and if they receive work, it hardly ever is full time (Swanson 2).

There is no room in a free America for racial differences in health care, job placement, as well as living conditions. If one would take just a few minutes out of their day and do research online to find out some statistics of minorities vs. whites in anything their heart desires. The end results that they will receive are quite frightening. Something as simple as buying a car can cost a black man $1,000 than a white man (Fix 3). Or take, for example, the number of hours that a black man works vs. the number of hours that a white man does. For every 100 hours of opportunity to work for a white man, a black man is only offered 33 hours (Fix 2). Maybe the hourly wage is what you are more interested in. Say for instance a white man makes $20 an hour; a black man would only make $7 an hour. That is a 65 percent decrease (Fix 1)! Instead of America’s schools and neighborhoods being integrated, they are becoming more and more segregated (Fix 5). What kind of society are we coming to if different races can’t live side by side? It is not the 1960’s anymore. It is ok to live next to someone who isn’t the same race as you. While 60 percent of whites think that the conditions for the blacks have greatly improved, the blacks tend to disagree. Only 35 percent share the same view as that of the whites (Fix 7). Just keep in mind that every week, tensions between the whites and the minorities grow stronger and stronger. Not a week can go by where a story is heard where race is not factor. Who knows, the next story that might come out might involve someone you love, or maybe even yourself. How would you feel if you were the reason that a child had to say good-bye to their parents when they were only six years old, because they lived in the same town since they were a child and all of the toxic fumes gave them cancer? How would you feel if you were a doctor and you knew that if a patient didn’t get your care that they would die, and you chose to let them die just because of the color of their skin. How would you feel if you were that one employer who could either save a family from being homeless, or having a home and you chose not to hire their father simply because of the color of their skin so now they are forced to live on the streets? How would you feel?

Bibliography
“Art Lewin Clothiers.â€￾ Top Hispanic Entrepreneurs. April 2003. 12 December 2004. <http://www.hispanionline.com/magazine/2003/april/Business/index.html>.

Bullard, Robert D. “Environmental Racism and the Environmental Justice.â€￾ Ed. Alan Jay Soza. 16 June 1997. Tamucc. 13 December 2004. Texas A&M-Corpus Christi. <http://www.tamucc.edu/~whatley/padm5370/read05c.htm>.

Fix, Michael E. and Margery Austin Turner. “A National Report Card on Discrimination in America.â€￾ 1 March 1998. The Urban Institute. 3 December 2004. <http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=308024>.

Gilmer, Charles. “Let’s Give the Dream a New Life.â€￾ http://everystudent.com http://everystudent.comhttp://everystudent.com[/URL]. 4 December 2004. <http://everystudent.com/features/dream.html>.

“I Have a Dream.â€￾ Creighton University. 4 December 2004. <http://www.creighton.edu/mlk/speeches/dream.html>.

Klinenberg, Eric. “Americans fight for ecological justice.â€￾ 1998. Le Monde diplomatique. 14 December 2004. [URL=http://mondediplo.com/1998/02/09ecojustice>[/URL].

Krueger, Alan. “What’s in a Name? Perhaps Plenty if You’re a Job Seeker.â€￾ 12 December 2002. The New York Times. 1 December 2004. [URL=http://www.j-]http://www.j-bradford- delong.net/movable_type/archives/001253.html>.

Nelson, Alan R. Brian D. Smedley, Adrienne Y. Stith ed. “Minorities More Likely to Receive Lower-Quality Health Care, Regardless of Income and Insurance Coverage.â€￾ 20 March 2002. The National Academies. 2 December 2004. [URL=http://www4.nationalacademies.org/news.nsf/isbn/030908265X OpenDocument>.

Swanson, Linda L. “Minorities Represent Growing Share of Tomorrow’s Work Force.â€￾ 1997. Economic Research Service United States Department of Agriculture. 12 December 2004. <http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/rcat/rcat92/rcat92b.pdf>.

Watson, Jamal. “Black Males Unemployed.â€￾ New York Amsterdam News. 29 November 2004. Infoshop News. 1 December 2004. <http://www.infoshop.org/inews/stories.php?story=04/11/29/0109805>.

Watson, Jamal. “Writings.â€￾ 1 December 2004. <http://www.jamalwatson.com/writings.html>.

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whatchagot4meMRJT
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Postby whatchagot4meMRJT » Wed Dec 15, 2004 8:37 am

Heather, I think you've got a great speech here. :clap: You give a lot of important and relevant facts. I love the use of quotes ... I was always a huge "quoter" in my papers. :lol: And I knew relatively nothing about the environmental discrimination, so you taught me something new and interesting. I think your class will enjoy the speech -- very easy to follow.

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Angelpopstar7
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Postby Angelpopstar7 » Wed Dec 15, 2004 5:23 pm

aww thanks Paigey :hug: :blowkiss: I hope that i don't bore them to death cause i know some of the speaches that go on in there are well :yawn: lol

dang i make a lot of sleeping mistakes late at night lol...i just realized that :rofl: i better go back and edit some of that lol

PS. I got your card in the mail yesterday and Rach and I sent yours today :nod:

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whatchagot4meMRJT
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Postby whatchagot4meMRJT » Wed Dec 15, 2004 6:12 pm

:yay: Yay, you got my card. I'm glad. :hug:


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